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Editorial: 'Men's studies' would lead to more gender trouble

Published: Friday, April 16, 2010

Updated: Friday, August 23, 2013 18:08

Although creating a separate field of study called "men's studies" would be redundant expanding women's studies into gender studies would not be remiss. Recently, colleges across the nation have created concentrations known as either male or men's studies in response to women's studies. But this is the incorrect reaction. These majors tend to denounce or demean the topics broached in women's studies classes, instead of working with them and finding relevant parallels.

Living in a society that is male-dominated means that many fields already inadvertently stem from "male studies" – textbooks are mostly written by men and thus have a male perspective. History classes almost always focus on men, and therefore has a male perspective. Creating men's studies is only going to cause a greater divide between the genders and create more misunderstanding. Studies about men and masculinity should not be pitted against studies about women and femininity. Both can coexist and be discussed together.

Women's studies continues to be a necessary field because women are not always adequately represented in other areas. But women's studies can incorporate masculinities effectively. Many women's studies programs already encompass gender studies in general. The interaction between men and women, and the reasoning behind male dominance, are features that appear in a multitude of women's studies courses.

Certainly, there are differences between the genders – differences that should be studied. Colleges need to take care to not let men's studies become what they accuse women's studies of being: biased and unbalanced. One of the primary issues with this topic is that groups that advocate men's studies tend to have incorrect notions about women's studies classes and feminism. They create their idea of men's studies based on their wrong idea about women's studies.

Creating a discipline of gender studies, whether separate from women's studies or inserted as a concentration, would be the best choice. There are misconceptions that women's studies is relevant only to women, and a change of name can help eliminate these.

Students should understand that gender is an important issue to everyone. By promoting classes that examine gender studies on a whole, colleges can ensure that a proper education is maintained without devaluing any preexisting subject.

 

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9 comments Log in to Comment

John D
Wed Apr 28 2010 14:46
Per the article:
"There are misconceptions that women’s studies is relevant only to women, and a change of name can help eliminate these."

Simply changing the name of women's studies to gender studies won't accomplish much when the core teachings state that all men are all women's class enemy and introduce ideas like "male privilege" (snort laugh).

The issues of male disposability and internalizing pain (to name just two) need to be addressed in a non-feminist (blame-the-man) enviroment.

Marx - Antimisandry.com
Tue Apr 27 2010 23:35
"These majors tend to denounce or demean the topics broached in women’s studies classes, instead of working with them and finding relevant parallels."
Your article is full of misinformation from start to finish. The above quote seems to imply that you want anything looking at sex, gender, men or women - to follow feminist ideology, which systematically blames men for all the world's problems - especially those of women. Women's studies has attempted to rewrite history to elevate women and knock men down.

"Living in a society that is male-dominated means that many fields already inadvertently stem from “male studies” – textbooks are mostly written by men and thus have a male perspective."
Again, this is wrong. For example, politics is all about how to please women and screw-over the men. Sure it may be men in the top, but they're there working primarily to benefit women - not men. So, let's not pretend women are eternal victims, as feminist ideology insists.

"Studies about men and masculinity should not be pitted against studies about women and femininity. Both can coexist and be discussed together."
Yes, they can - but if they're to work in line with feminist ideology, then it would be an intensely one-sided and skewed perspective being promoted, as is already the case due to feminist ideology being so dominant in the academic field.

"The interaction between men and women, and the reasoning behind male dominance, are features that appear in a multitude of women’s studies courses."
And it's always the same theme - men bad / women good. Yes, yes - I've heard if time after time. What feminism refuses to do, that is becoming increasingly important - is take a shred of female responsibility. Rather than looking at how BOTH genders cause problems, it lays all the blame on men and demands women be viewed as victims. For example, 'gender studies' could discuss male suicides, lack of male health funding, male-hostile academic atmosphere, etc. But no, feminism prefers to blame men for each of them. That women can so easily strip a man of his life (children, home, income, unsubstantiated abuse claims, etc.) relating to male suicide does not enter a feminists mind. Instead, it is simple - men are at fault. Obviously, a none-feminist perspective is required here to gain some balance.

Admin of Antimisandry.com

Anonymous
Tue Apr 27 2010 13:36
Anything that help men will of course be resisted by reactionary feminists and their wimpy male fellow travellers. Nobody will be forced to embark on such a course of studies, unlike the mandatory training on 'gender and equality' that men are routinely forced to endure. Hopefully these new courses will help to redress the balance after decades of a totally one sided debate.
Anonymous
Tue Apr 27 2010 10:36
And continued WST to exclude Male Studies would lead to less "gender trouble"? If anything, a countervailing Male Studies dept. would decrease the "trouble" by giving college men someplace to go to have their needs and ideas addressed. Ignoring problems doesn't make them go away, only get worse. One cannot with a straight face say that gender issues affecting men are adequately addressed in WST classes.
Anonymous
Tue Apr 27 2010 02:22
I think its important to have different perspectives on gender issues. For some reason, feminists think their ideology on gender is not open for debate and should not be challenged.
Anonymous
Sun Apr 18 2010 20:45
Don't know the last time if ever I hired anyone with a "women's studies" type degree. Not sure I ever would. What we are looking for are young adults with a college degree and skills. Liberal Arts type of degrees are becoming obsolete in the so called real world. Please think twice about this type of major, especially if your parents are paying for your education.
Anonymous
Fri Apr 16 2010 10:26
I am against any male studies academic programs because they do not bring anything valuable to the society and have no realistic prospects for employment outside of artificial government jobs. In a plain language, these degrees are worthless.

From the other side, many universities have so called "womens studies", "african american studies", "chicano studies", "gender studies" degrees that are absolutely useless, have no academic credibility
and are mainly used as a fallback for people who do not qualify to be admitted into the normal academic programs. After the graduation with these "degrees" some people even manage to extort some jobs from the government, usually in enforcing the affirmative action or some other artificial quota systems.

So these "male studies" is just one more degree for people who cannot get anything more valuable, and want to rely on government to feed them till the end of their "career".

Anonymous
Fri Apr 16 2010 08:07
Men's studies majors will primarily create one thing: Unemployment. Imagine going into a job interview and saying "Yeah, I majored in men's studies." Think you'll be getting the job? Go learn something useful in college. Same goes for women's studies.
Paul Elam
Fri Apr 16 2010 02:58
I am absolutely astounded at the deficit of understanding in this article.

Colleges across the nation have not at all created any "male" studies programs at any school. In fact, only the idea of male studies as a new discipline was introduced last week at a conference at Wagner College in New York.

There have been women's, men's, and more recently gender studies in places nationwide for the last three plus decades, but all three are rooted in feminist ideology. The caution you have called for has been largely ignored, and is in fact, the precipitating factor that necessitates non ideological, scholarly investigation of the human male in the first place.

Men and boys face a unique set of problems, from a drastic disparity in the rate of male suicides, to the waning presence and lagging performance on men in higher education, none of which have been given any real attention by other disciplines, including the ones you claim are already from a males perspective.

That is divisive, and that is why male studies are needed. I hope your school can see past the clear bias in this editorial and embrace this needed field of study.

Regards,

Paul Elam
Editor-in-Chief
Men's News Daily

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